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Furman Hosts Photography Exhibition Jan. 17-Feb. 21

Untitled fromTerri Bright's "Sonnets" project

The Furman University Art Department will host a photography exhibition Jan. 17-Feb. 21 in Thompson Gallery of the Roe Art Building on the Furman campus. Thompson Gallery hours are 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Public Bomb Shelter, Haifa by Adam Reynolds
Public Bomb Shelter, Haifa by Adam Reynolds

The exhibition, Re-vision: New Directions in Traditional Genres, is free and open to the public. It features work by four emerging artists: Furman faculty member Terri Bright (Greenville, S.C.), Adam Reynolds (Columbus, Ind.), Ivette Spradlin (Pittsburgh, Penn.) and Mike Tittel (Cincinnati, Ohio).

Having met at the Flash Powder Photography residency in 2015, these four contemporary artists reconsider traditional themes and approaches to photography. The bodies of work in the exhibition represent the genres of still life, portraiture, documentary and street photography, all thoughtfully explored and reimagined. Re-vision was previously featured in an exhibition titled Fresh + Flash + Photographic, co-curated by Jennifer Riley and Adam Reynolds at Indiana University Center for Art + Design (IUCA+D) in Columbus.

For more information about the exhibition, contact Terri Bright at 864-294-3360, or terri.bright@furman.edu.

 

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