Skip to main content
News

The problem with ‘allyship’

allyship graphic
iStockphoto.com
Evan Meyers ’21

In an article he penned for National Review, Furman University senior Evan Meyers makes an argument against “allyship” and the “Black friends” approach as models for interracial relations, especially in light of the murder of George Floyd. Trusting in the “transformative power of true friendships,” Meyers says both approaches are “two sides of the same coin,” and that “both the ‘Black friends’ argument and allyship ultimately make people of color props, mere means to ends.”

Instead, Meyers encourages “complete friendship” and adds, “Today, in the wake of the Derek Chauvin verdict and the Ma’Khia Bryant shooting, students seeking to fight racism should stop performing sacraments of social justice on Instagram and reject allyship as it is currently understood. Making friends is far better – though admittedly far more difficult – than mere allyship.”

From Birmingham, Alabama, Meyers is the former editor-in-chief of The Paladin, host of the ZoomUni podcast, and will graduate with a bachelor’s in politics and international affairs with a minor in Latin American Studies.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Last updated .

Volunteers with Furman’s Community Conservation Corps work on weatherizing a home.

Shi Institute earns international acclaim from UN program

Since 2010, the CCC has helped more than 160 low- and moderate-income homes in Greenville become more energy efficient.

Two football players carrying an injured player off the field.

Students study how to prevent injuries in high school athletes

Long-term goal is to create a program to monitor and track sports injuries to keep athletes safer.

Photo: iStock

New program to spark Greenville’s next high-impact ventures

GVL STARTS builds on the success of Furman’s Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship.

Michaela Barnett ’15, founder of KnoxFill

Alumna’s startup promotes sustainability with refillable containers

With KnoxFill, Michaela Barnett ’15 delivers household products and collects the empties ‘just like the milkman’