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Challenging the NCAA: HBCUs say no more discrimination in academic rules

Monique Ositelu '11
Monique Ositelu '11

Monique Ositelu has spent a good deal of her professional time thinking about the inequities of the NCAA’s system for measuring academic performance at traditional colleges and Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). Ositelu, a 2011 Furman University psychology alumna and former member of Furman’s Division 1 Cross-Country/Track & Field team, is a senior policy analyst at New America, a policy think tank in Washington, D.C. She was tapped for a story by NPR’s Tom Goldman, contributor to “All Things Considered.”

In the story, Goldman addresses the class action, civil rights lawsuit brought by lawyers representing HBCU athletes that demands the NCAA’s Academic Performance Program be abolished. Ositelu said, “It’s an inaccurate, inequitable and discriminatory tool. In its attempt to say it’s measuring academic progress, there’s no empirical evidence that it’s doing that.”

Ositelu holds a master’s in public administration with a concentration in public policy from the University of Texas at El Paso, and a doctorate in higher education with a specialization in public policy from Florida State University.

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