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Q&A with Furman theatre arts professor Maegan Azar

Maegan Azar is associate professor of acting and directing at Furman University. Photo by Will Crooks/Greenville Journal

Furman University Associate Professor of Acting and Directing Maegan McNerney Azar practices what she preaches. In addition to her teaching role at Furman, she is an actor and director who is currently leading the production of “The Tin Woman,” which opens June 19 at Greenville’s Centre Stage.

Greenville Journal guest columnist Neil Shurley caught up with Azar. She talks about how she came to be in theatre, her most loved and challenging roles, and offers her take on the Greenville theatre scene. “One of the things I most enjoy is the ability to see an actor in a show at Greenville Little Theatre … then at South Carolina Children’s Theatre … then Centre Stage … and then Warehouse, and see what happens to that actor as they progress. I find that the more work I do, the more I am inspired by the collaboration in the room. I like to work with people who are excited to tell a new story …,” said Azar.

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