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One of the cruelest twists in youth sports

Furman University health sciences professor Bill Pierce unpacks why the careers of female teen distance runners often stall as they grow older.
Bill Pierce, Furman University Department of Health Sciences

Female distance runners tend to hit their stride in their teens. Whether they can sustain top speeds as they reach their early 20s is anybody’s guess. In an article appearing in The New York Times, Furman University health sciences professor Bill Pierce unpacks why the careers of teen phenoms often stall as they grow older. Pierce, co-founder of the Furman Institute of Running and Scientific Training, said, “[Teenagers] are nothing but skin and bones and lungs in their early years” and don’t necessarily develop the strength and lung capacity to swiftly move a larger frame as they mature.

With Furman health sciences professor Scott Murr, Pierce is co-author of “Runner’s World Train Smart, Run Forever: How to Become a Fit and Healthy Lifelong Runner by Following The Innovative 7-Hour Workout Week.”

 

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