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Jefferson Awards Foundation announces 2018 Class of ChangeMakers

Furman University graduates Blair Knobel '03 and Jason Richards '01 are inaugural members of the 2018 Class of ChangeMakers.

The goal of the Jefferson Awards Foundation in South Carolina is to cultivate the next generation of the state’s servant leaders. With that in mind, the organization has selected its first class of ChangeMakers—10 individuals in the Upstate age 40 and under—who have demonstrated a commitment to service and the potential to move the Upstate forward. Among the inaugural class of ChangeMakers are Furman graduates Blair Knobel (B.A., art, ’03), editor-in-chief of TOWN magazine, and Jason Richards (B.A., political science, ’01), COO and shareholder, NAI Earle Furman. Richards also serves on the Furman University Board of Trustees.

Throughout the spring, ChangeMakers will work both individually and as a cohort to raise financial support for Students In Action, the Jefferson Awards Foundation’s leadership development program that uses service-learning for equipping high school students with the life skills they need to be successful in college and the workforce. Read more about the program in Upstate Business Journal and Greenville Business Magazine.

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