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Fort Mill High senior organizes event to empower women leaders

Fort Mill High School senior Erica Daly participated in the Riley Institute’s Emerging Public Leaders program over the summer.

Fort Mill High School senior Erica Daly is working toward closing the gender gap in public office positions. Daly, a participant in the Riley Institute’s Emerging Public Leaders (EPL) program, has organized Mentoring Future Women Leaders, a panel of women leaders sharing tips and lessons they’ve learned. The idea for the event stemmed from Daly’s summertime EPL community service project focused on women in leadership–an area she chose because of South Carolina’s bottom 10 ranking for women in elected office. In a story appearing in The Herald/Fort Mill Times, Daly said, “It is important for women to have more equal representation in policy decisions, because every policy has an impact on individuals and families sooner or later …”

Mentoring Future Women Leaders takes place 7-8 p.m., Thursday, March 15 at Glennon Community Center in Tega Cay. The event is free, but seating is limited. Register at eventbrite.com/e/mentoring-future-women-leaders-tickets-43393403839. For more information, call 803-431-1883 or email ericadaly18@gmail.com.

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