Skip to main content
News

Riley Institute Montessori study creates media buzz

©2018. Courtesy American Montessori Society. Used with permission. All rights reserved.

With a study as comprehensive as the Riley Institute’s newly published findings on the benefits of the public sector Montessori school model, there’s little wonder why it has generated such a stir among media outlets in the education sphere. The study shows that low-income, non-low-income, black, white, male, and female students in Montessori schools demonstrated significantly more progress than their non-Montessori peers, reported The 74a non-profit, non-partisan news site covering education in America.

Montessori Public also unpacked the findings and said, “The researchers and funders associated with the Riley Institute at Furman that made this [study] happen have delivered a phenomenal contribution to Montessori research.” The study is mentioned in the Index-Journal (Greenwood, S.C.) where the Self Family Foundation is applauded for supporting the research, and more recently, here, where the study’s author, Brooke Culclasure of the Riley Institute, said, “[South Carolina is] seen as a leader in Montessori, particularly in public schools, and that’s … very impressive.”

Earlier, blogger Sarah D. Sparks of Education Week said, “South Carolina’s push to bring the century-old Montessori model to public classrooms may be paying off in both student performance and creativity.”

Last updated .

More in Public Engagement

Furman recognizes Women’s Leadership Institute graduates

Thirty-six members of the Class of 2018 are recognized.

Is this the way to transform struggling rural schools?

Former Governor of South Carolina and U.S. Secretary of Education Richard W, Riley '54 applauds the New Tech Network school model.

Furman receives grant for Healthy Greenville project

The grant awarded to Furman's Institute for the Advancement of Community Health addresses Greenville's senior adult population.

College Advising Corps gets a boost

Furman is among the colleges that work with the organization to assist low-income and first-generation students.