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Poet, environmentalist, publisher Thomas Rain Crowe ’72 speaks Oct. 18

Thomas Rain Crowe (Class of 1972)

Poet, environmentalist and publisher Thomas Rain Crowe (Furman Class of 1972) will speak on campus Wednesday, Oct. 18 at 7 p.m. in Watkins Room of the Trone Student Center.

Thomas Rain Crowe ’72 will speak Wednesday, Oct. 18 at 7 p.m. in Watkins Room.

“An Evening With Thomas Rain Crowe ’72” is free and open to the public, and is sponsored by the Friends of the Furman University Libraries and the Furman Department of English. Crowe will read from his work, and share experiences from his life and his time at Furman during 1968-1972.

After graduating Furman, Crowe was the editor of Beatitude magazine, served as an organizer of poetry readings in the San Francisco Bay area, and was a member of the “Baby Beats” poetry circle in the 1970s.

Returning home to Western North Carolina, he lived sustainably in his Saluda, N.C. cabin for several years, an experience that resulted in the award-winning memoir Zoro’s Field: My Life in the Appalachian Woods (2006).

Crowe is the founder and editor of the New Native Press, a publishing imprint based in Western North Carolina devoted to publishing authors in translation from around the world. Crowe is a musician and a regular book and music reviewer for national publications. His latest book of poems is Learning to Dance: Selected Love Poems, 1975-2015.

Visit https://newnative.wordpress.com for more information about Crowe. Or contact Jeffrey Makala, Special Collections Librarian and University Archivist, 864-294-2714, jeffrey.makala@furman.edu.

 

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