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OLLI at Furman accepting applications for Senior Leaders Greenville

The program equips participants to be advocates and change-makers so they can represent the senior population in a variety of ways.

The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at Furman is accepting applications through June 9 for Class 4, Senior Leaders Greenville.

Launched in 2013, Senior Leaders Greenville is a program designed for adults 55 and up who want to play a more essential role in the community. The program empowers participants to become active in fostering better lives for seniors in Greenville and the Upstate.

Senior Leaders Greenville, a community partnership with Upstate programs Senior Action, Greenville Chamber, and Bon Secours St. Francis Health System’s Lifewise, runs August 2017 to May 2018. The cost for the program is $350, and scholarships are available. The program is limited to 40 participants per year.

Senior Leaders Greenville, which graduates its third class May 24, equips participants to be advocates and change-makers so they can represent the senior population in a variety of ways including serving on boards or commissions, lobbying for issues affecting seniors, attending civic meetings, or even running for office.

Through monthly lectures, seminars, tours and working groups, seniors explore issues identified in the Lt. Governor’s State Plan on Aging, which addresses topics such as health, re-education, transportation, caregiving, end-of-life issues, nutrition, technology and more.

For more information about Senior Leaders Greenville including application details, visit the OLLI website, or contact OLLI Director Nancy Kennedy at 864-294-2998, or

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