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High Noon on April 5: Brent Nelsen looks at Trump presidency

Brent Nelsen has been a member of the Furman faculty since 1990.

Brent Nelsen, professor of Politics and International Affairs at Furman University, will analyze the first few months of Donald Trump’s presidency when he speaks at the university’s High Noon spring lecture series Wednesday, April 5.

“The First 76 Days: A Look at the Trump Presidency” begins at noon at the Upcountry History Museum-Furman.  Nelsen will provide a brief overview of the events that have transpired thus far in the Trump presidency and then open the floor to questions from the audience.

The spring High Noon series continues Wednesday, April 5 with a talk by Furman professor Brent Nelsen.

His talk is free and open to the public.

Nelsen joined the Furman faculty in 1990.  In addition to teaching courses on Europe and the European Union, he is a frequent commentator in the media on American politics.  He serves on the Board of Directors of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, and is also chairman of the South Carolina Education Television Commission.  A graduate of Wheaton College, he holds M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from University of Wisconsin-Madison.

The Upcountry History Museum/Furman is located at 540 Buncombe Street in downtown Greenville’s Heritage Green area.

The final lecture in the spring series will take place Wednesday April 12 when Jessica Taylor, a Furman alum and Lead Digital Reporter with National Public Radio, speaks on “Media in the Age of Trump.”

For more information, contact Furman’s Marketing and Public Relations office at 864-294-3107 or vince.moore@furman.edu.

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