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Furman Student Honored by Save the Children Action Network

Kjersti Kleine ’17 has won a national award from Save the Children Action Network (SCAN).

The inaugural Student Advocate of the Year award was presented to Kleine during the Invest In Kids Advocacy Summit held April 10-12 in Washington, D.C. The event was hosted by hosted by Save the Children and Save the Children Action Network.

Said Kelsey Nulph, Coordinator for Mobilization at SCAN, “…the Student Advocate of the Year award recognizes a student who has been involved with Save the Children Action Network’s Student Ambassador Program and has exemplified leadership, service and dedication to advocacy on behalf of children in need. Kjersti has epitomized these qualities and so much more. Selected from student advocates from across the country, Kjersti received this year’s award for her work on Furman’s campus to be a voice for children around the world.”

For more information, contact Health Sciences professor Dr. Meghan Slining, (864) 294-3684, or More information about Save the Children Action Network may be found at this link.

About Save the Children Action Network
Founded by Save the Children in 2014, Save the Children Action Network is a bipartisan organization that aims to mobilize Americans around a commitment to investing in early childhood. Established to expand Save the Children’s capacity to transform young lives, SCAN engages government, businesses, partner organizations and supporters to take action and to hold elected leaders accountable for the youngest global citizens.

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