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Singer-Songwriter Arlo Guthrie to perform Feb. 16

Arlo Guthrie, smSinger-songwriter Arlo Guthrie, son of seminal American folk musician Woody Guthrie, will perform in concert Sunday, Feb. 16 at 2 p.m. in McAlister Auditorium on the Furman University campus.

A tribute to American folk music, “Here Come the Kids” is presented by Greenville’s Year of Altruism and Furman. Tickets are $20 in advance ($25 at the door), $5 for youth and students, and free for children under five. Tickets are available at the Timmons Arena Box Office or through Ticketmaster.  The McAlister Auditorium doors open at 1 p.m.

Concert-goers are asked to bring jars of peanut butter and jelly to support the Mission Backpack program, which ensures children at risk of hunger have a food source during the weekends and over extended holidays.

Touring since October 2013, “Here Come the Kids” features Arlo Guthrie, along with his son, Abe Guthrie (keyboards and vocals), Bobby Sweet (guitar and vocals), and long-time friend Terry A La Berry (drums and vocals).

Born in Coney Island, Brooklyn, N.Y. in 1947, Guthrie is the eldest son of beloved singer, writer and philosopher Woody Guthrie and Marjorie Mazia Guthrie, professional dancer and founder of The Committee to Combat Huntington’s Disease.

Guthrie gave his first public performance in 1961 at age 13 and quickly became immersed in the music that was shaping the world. Over the next few years, Guthrie teamed with his father’s friend Pete Seeger, and the two toured together, between demonstrations, beginning in the late ’60s. They continued performing more than a dozen shows annually for the next 40 years creating a legendary collaboration that continues today.

Guthrie’s career exploded in 1967 with the release of album Alice’s Restaurant, whose title song premiered at the Newport Folk Festival and helped foster a new commitment to social consciousness and activism among the ’60s generation. Guthrie went on to star in the 1969 Hollywood film version of “Alice’s Restaurant,” directed by Arthur Penn.

In addition to “Alice’s Restaurant,” Guthrie is known for songs like “Coming into Los Angeles,” and the definitive rendition of Steve Goodman’s “City of New Orleans.”

Over the last 50 years, Guthrie has toured throughout North America, Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia. Besides his accomplishments as a musician playing the piano, six- and twelve-string guitar, harmonica and a dozen other instruments, Guthrie is a storyteller whose tales and anecdotes figure prominently into his performances.

In 1991 Guthrie founded the Guthrie Center, a not-for-profit interfaith church foundation dedicated to providing a wide range of local and international services including outreach for HIV/AIDS and support for Huntington’s Disease. The Guthrie Foundation is also an educational organization which addresses issues like the environment, health care, cultural preservation and educational exchange.

Tickets are available at Timmons Arena Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., or by calling 864-294-3097. McAlister Auditorium box office opens at 1p.m. on day of show.

Tickets are also available at all Ticketmaster outlets, by visiting www.ticketmaster.com, or by calling 1-800-745-3000 to charge by phone.

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