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Furman professor co-edits book that advances “religion with religion”

MAY 18, 2012
by Tina T. Underwood, Contributing Writer

GREENVILLE, S.C. —J. Aaron Simmons, an assistant professor of philosophy at Furman, has co-edited a new book with Stephen Minister, assistant professor of philosophy at Augustana College.

Reexamining Deconstruction and Determinate Religion: Toward a Religion with Religion will be available through Duquesne University Press in October 2012.

The book addresses the conventional conflicts between those who desire a more objective, determinate, and quasi-evidentialist perspective on faith and religious truth and those who adopt a more poetic, indeterminate, relativistic, and radical one.

Drawing on both continental and analytic philosophy, the volume offers a sustained challenge to the prominent paradigm of a “religion without religion,” proposed in a deconstructive philosophy of religion.

The book features extended essays by Simmons and Minister as well as Bruce Ellis Benson, John D. Caputo, Drew M. Dalton, Jeffrey Hanson and Merold Westphal.

For more information about Reexamining Deconstruction and Determinate Religion, contact J. Aaron Simmons in the Philosophy Department at (864) 294-3526, or aaron.simmons@furman.edu.

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