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Paladins in the struggle

University of North Alabama Assistant Professor of History Ansley Quiros ’08 will discuss the role of theology in the black freedom struggle in the South

University of North Alabama Assistant Professor of History Ansley Quiros ’08 will present “Paladins in the Struggle: Lived Theology and Civil Rights in Americus, Ga., 1942-1965.”

The event, part of Furman’s Cultural Life Program, will be held from 4:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 28, in Patrick Lecture Hall in the Townes Science Building.

Celebrated author and civil rights reporter Marshall Frady ’63

Quiros will present on the role of theology in the black freedom struggle in the South, focusing on the stories of three Furman alumni—Martin England ’24, Harold Collins ’47 and Marshall Frady ’63.

Her upcoming book on the topic is titled, God With Us: Lived Theology and the Civil Rights Struggle in Americus, Georgia, 1942-1976.

Quiros joined the faculty at the University of North Alabama in 2014. Her research interests include the history of the Civil Rights Movement, American religious history, the history of the South, African American history and oral history.

She earned her B.A. in History and Latin American studies from Furman and her M.A. and Ph.D. in history from Vanderbilt University.

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