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High Noon: Shi to speak on history of race relations in U.S. March 29

President Emeritus David Shi is currently teaching in the history department at Furman.

Historian and former Furman University president David E. Shi will talk about the history of race relations in the U.S. when he speaks at the university’s High Noon spring lecture series Wednesday, March 29.

“A More Perfect Union: Race in American History,” which begins at noon at the Upcountry History Museum-Furman, will provide an overview of the vexing and volatile history of race in the American experience: how it has been defined, abused, embraced and overcome.

It is free and open to the public.

The spring High Noon series will feature four lectures.

Shi is president emeritus and professor of history at Furman.  He served as the university’s 10th president from 1994 to 2010, and spent another 17 years teaching history at Davidson College.  He is the author of The Simple Life: Plain Living and High Thinking in American Culture and co-author of America: A Narrative History, the best-selling history textbook in the United States. An Atlanta native and a 1973 Furman graduate, Shi holds M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in history from the University of Virginia.

The Upcountry History Museum/Furman is located at 540 Buncombe Street in downtown Greenville’s Heritage Green area.

Here are the other lectures in the spring High Noon series.

 April 5

“The First 76 Days: A Look at the Trump Presidency”

Brent Nelsen, Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Furman University

April 12

“Media in the Age of Trump”

Jessica Taylor, Lead Digital Political Reporter, National Public Radio

A complete schedule of the High Noon lectures is available on Furman’s website.

For more information, contact Furman’s Marketing and Public Relations office at 864-294-3107 or vince.moore@furman.edu.

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