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Thumbs up for The Invalid

Jay Oney smallFurman University Theatre dishes out a heaping of laughs and comedic wit in their latest performance The Imaginary Invalid by Molière. The seventeenth century comic genius was well-known for his satirical plays which poke fun at Renaissance era French society. The Imaginary Invalid was no different and kept the Playhouse audience of 90 engrossed in the action during all three acts.

Molière’s humorous satire about the medical field tells the story of Argan, a wealthy invalid who believes he is ill with an unidentifiable disease. Throughout the play, he encounters various taxing circumstances including a daughter who is resistant to an arranged marriage and a second wife who is after his wealth that show him that his illness might just be imaginary.

The talented cast of 12 takes the audience through various scenes that joke about French society and the professional antics of doctors. The play points to the flaws of doctors and suggests that they may not be as qualified as society thinks they are.

Furman Theatre Arts Professor Jay Oney, Ph.D., plays the role of Argan. Professor Rhett Bryson directs the play and is the sound designer. Alan Bryson is the technical director and plays the role of Dr. Purgon. The costume designer is senior theatre major Callie Nestleroth ’14.

Throughout the play, the housekeeper Toinette, played by Kenzie Wynne ’17 provided humorous interjections and Thomas Diaforius, a suitor to Argan’s daughter, played by Sam Nelson ‘17 provided an entertaining nonsensical view of doctor’s training. The tale about the misadventures of nonsensical doctors and their gullible patients runs April 2-5 and April 10-12 at 8 p.m. with at matinee at 3 p.m., Sunday April 6 in Furman’s Playhouse.

 

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