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History museum lecture explores state’s golf history

Although Scotland may have been where golf was first played, South Carolina now has a new claim to fame: the birthplace of golf in North America.

In partnership with Furman University, The Upcountry History Museum is sponsoring a ‘Lunchbox Learning’ series to showcase interesting and unexpected aspects of South Carolina history. Wednesday’s feature, held noon to 1 p.m., will discuss the evolution of golf in South Carolina. It will showcase never-before-seen documents dating back to 1739 proving the delivery of golf equipment to Charleston.

This delivery pre-dates all other colonies, making South Carolina truly the ‘first’ in golf history. The lecture will also address South Carolina’s early golf courses and other golf ‘firsts’ achieved in the state.  The program will be led by Faye Jensen, Executive Director of the South Carolina Historical Society. The program is free to all faculty and staff with Furman ID and $3 for all OLLI members.

For more information see the upcountry history museum website.

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